EP: Delain ‘Lunar Prelude’ (Napalm Records)

NB: For reviews, Air Guitar ratings will appear from now on. 5 – Delightful; 4 – Deserving; 3 – Decent; 2 – Dreary; 1 – Dismal. Look out for the inflatable guitars! 

Delain’s next full studio album is currently in progress, but as that isn’t due until later in the year the Dutch symphonic metallers have issued this mini-album. A similar idea to when they issued their ‘Interlude’ compilation between studio albums, the artwork for this release is once again provided by Glenn Arthur, who started working with the band on 2012’s ‘We Are The Others’. The record was issued in both vinyl and CD format, and this time I plumped for the ‘gold’ vinyl edition, available only by mail order. I treated myself to a vinyl copy of ‘We Are The Others’ at their merchandise stall on the last UK run, and found it a better listen than the CD edition; it seemed to have better range in its sound.

The record comprises two new studio tracks (‘Suckerpunch’ and ‘Turn The Lights Out’), one song from the last album (‘Don’t Let Go’) reworked and several live cuts, plus an ‘orchestral’ arrangement of ‘Suckerpunch’. It is therefore a shorter offering than ‘Interlude’ (which was a collection of ‘B’ sides, reworked material, live tracks and two new songs) but is intended to serve much the same purpose: to keep the band’s profile high while they work on the follow-up to 2014’s ‘The Human Contradiction’, scheduled for release later in 2016.

Taking the record from its sleeve, first impressions were that the streaky yellow appearance of the vinyl gave a  rather different impression to the ‘gold’ effect that they were going for (!) but the disc itself appears to be heavy duty vinyl; you can’t use it like a wobble board like you could with some LP records back in the 1980s! Disc colour notwithstanding, the needle was dropped into the groove and it was time to pin back the lugholes…

Both ‘Suckerpunch’ and ‘Turn The Lights Out’ have been performed live; the latter debuted on the UK tour and the former provided the basis for the theme behind the band’s recent show at Haarlem which I attended. On record they are rather ‘lighter’ in tone than live; there’s not as much emphasis on the guitar, even though the group now boast two axe-slingers with the recent addition of Merel Bechtold as a permanent member, alongside incumbent guitarist Timo Somers.

‘Suckerpunch’ sounds rather like a 1980s pop-rock song, with it’s ‘whoa-whoa’ hook and also using the old modulation trick on the chorus near the end, it isn’t a million miles away from the sort of thing Bon Jovi broke big with 30 years ago. One definitely aimed at the radio, even if the lyrical content isn’t quite the sort of standard boy/girl stuff of typical chart hits (‘Suckerpunch the demons from my dreams’, sings Charlotte Wessels over those Jovi-esque ‘whoa’ chants). ‘Turn The Lights Out’ is even lighter in tone, with the singer’s sweeter side shown on the chorus. Whether this suggests a rather poppier direction for the next record is still to be determined, but if they are going that way then remember to pack the guitars – their best album to date (IMO) ‘April Rain’ was very much in that vein, strong pop songs with enough of a heavy guitar base to satisfy those of a more metallic persuasion.

Next is the reworked version of ‘Don’t Let Go’, a track originally found on the expanded edition of ‘The Human Contradiction’. This one HAS been given a slightly heavier treatment, but is still difficult to distinguish from the original version. Similar to the reworked treatment of ‘Are You Done With Me’ found on ‘Interlude’, you have to listen to them back-to-back to spot differences in production. I’d have liked to see something completely different to the original if they are going to redo a recent track, the differences are so slight as to render this version almost redundant.

The best part of this record is definitely the live section; there are four live tracks presumably taken from a recent show in their home country, as the frontwoman can be heard addressing the crowd in her native Dutch between songs. All the live tracks (‘Lullaby’, ‘Stardust’, ‘Here Come The Vultures’, ‘Army Of Dolls’) featured on their last album , these versions showcase Wessels’ excellent live vocal and feature (I’m guessing) the expanded six-piece line-up. The lead guitar part on ‘Stardust’ does sound a little different in tone, suggesting it’s Merel Bechtold’s six-string we’re hearing. The songs do sound heavier, harder-hitting live than on the record now that they have a twin-guitar attack, and it’s to be hoped they can bring some of that heavier sound into the studio for the next album. The record closes with the orchestral version of ‘Suckerpunch’; again this is an idea reused from ‘The Human Contradiction’ where two songs were given similar treatment for the expanded 2-disc edition. I’d have preferred another live track personally, these orchestral arrangements sound like film scores and are little more than filler in my view.

All in all then a bit of a mixed bag; of the two new songs ‘Suckerpunch’ is the stronger but the live material is the most worthwhile for me, while I find the orchestral number and the remade song somewhat non-essential. One for existing fans rather than anybody new to the group; if you are just finding them I’d recommend starting with ‘We Are The Others’ as that album provides much of the basis for their live show still.

3gtrs

Decent

Delain-Lunar-Prelude-album-cover-delain-39117326-720-720

The artwork for Delain’s ‘Lunar Prelude’ by Glenn Arthur

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